INES WEEKLY INFORMATION SERVICE


The International Network of Engineers and Scientists for Global Responsibility (INES) is an independent non-profit-organization concerned about the impact of science and technology on society. INES was founded in 1991. INES' efforts focus on disarmament and international peace, ethics, justice and sustainable development. INES is affiliated with the United Nations an with UNESCO as a NON-Governmental Organization (NGO). INES has become a network of nearly 100 organisations and individual members.


The "What's New In INES" (wnii) is the main communication instrument of INES. It shall give the member organisations the possibility to publish their articles, and serve at the same time as a general overview of related international news.


Editor: Kristin Kropidlowski: wnii@inesglobal.com

WNII is archived under: http://www.inesglobal.com/whats_new_in_ines/Whats_new_in_ines_main.html

INES official site: http://inesglobal.com

INES international Office: ines.office@web.de

INES Chair: Claus Montonen: claus.montonen@helsinki.fi


The recent issue of the INES newsletter is available at:

http://www.inesglobal.com/newsletter/Newletter_main.html



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Topics, INES, wnii, Issue No. 8/2006, April 2006



1. WAR AND PEACE - ARMS RACE AND DISARMAMENT


- Is Iran next? The calculus of military strike by Mark Sappenfield


- The Iran Plans by Seymour M. Hersh


- Controlling the Bomb by Zia Mian



2. SCIENCE AND ETHICS


- Summer Institute on Teaching Nonproliferation



3. SUSTAINABILITY


- Silicon Valley Venture Capitalist Sees Big Opportunity in Green Technology


- Uganda: British Company Sets Up Large Forest Plantation


- Kenya: UNEP Gives Support to Planning Programme



4. NUCLEAR AND RENEWABLE ENERGIES


- Japan Begins Reprocessing Spent Nuclear Fuel



- 33% of World's Civilian Nuclear Reactors Lack Proper Security



5. CONFERENCES AND ACTIVITIES


- 2006 Berlin Conference on the Human Dimensions of Global Environmental Change, Berlin, 17-18 November 2006



- 10th Anniversary ICJ Advisory Opinion on Nuclear Weapons, Conference in Brussels, 6-7 July 2006



6. DOCUMENTATIONS


- Health Effects of Chernobyl


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1. WAR AND PEACE - ARMSRACE AND DISARMAMENT




IS IRAN NEXT? THE CALCULUS OF MILITARY STRIKE by Mark Sappenfield


Source:

http://www.csmonitor.com/2006/0412/p01s02-usfp.html


Tehran has raised the stakes, saying it is enriching uranium.


WASHINGTON - Time and again this week, President Bush and his team reiterated their position on Iran's nuclear program: America wants a diplomatic solution, and any suggestion it is moving toward an inevitable strike on Iran is "wild speculation."


At the same time, however, Mr. Bush has remained steadfast in his statements that a nuclear Iran is unacceptable and "no option is off the table" to prevent it.


The news Tuesday that Iran is now producing enriched uranium for atomic reactors - considered a first step toward nuclear weapons - has heightened the sense that America and Iran are on a collision course. A new article in The New Yorker claims that the administration is again on a path to war.


Yet amid the tumult is an effort to shape a debate that's more robust than the one before the Iraq war. While military action doesn't appear certain, the hint of it raises questions on the use of force, and what it might - and might not - accomplish.


It seems likely that precision airstrikes could set Iran's nuclear program back at least a year and perhaps several. Whether that delay is worth the probable consequences - the strengthening of a despotic regime within Iran and the increased likelihood of terrorism in nearby Iraq and the broader region - is what's at issue.


"The military option has a lot of costs," says Michael Rubin, an Iran expert at the American Enterprise Institute here. "But is the cost of the Islamic Republic of Iran having a nuclear weapon greater?"


Read the entire article:

http://www.csmonitor.com/2006/0412/p01s02-usfp.html




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THE IRAN PLANS by Seymour M. Hersh


Would President Bush go to war to stop Tehran from getting the bomb?


Source:

http://www.newyorker.com/printables/fact/060417fa_fact


The Bush Administration, while publicly advocating diplomacy in order to stop Iran from pursuing a nuclear weapon, has increased clandestine activities inside Iran and intensified planning for a possible major air attack. Current and former American military and intelligence officials said that Air Force planning groups are drawing up lists of targets, and teams of American combat troops have been ordered into Iran, under cover, to collect targeting data and to establish contact with anti-government ethnic-minority groups. The officials say that President Bush is determined to deny the Iranian regime the opportunity to begin a pilot program, planned for this spring, to enrich uranium.


American and European intelligence agencies, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), agree that Iran is intent on developing the capability to produce nuclear weapons. But there are widely differing estimates of how long that will take, and whether diplomacy, sanctions, or military action is the best way to prevent it. Iran insists that its research is for peaceful use only, in keeping with the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, and that it will not be delayed or deterred.


Rad more:

http://www.newyorker.com/printables/fact/060417fa_fact


Interesting comments on the article you will find at:

http://disarmamentactivist.org/



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CONTROLLING THE BOMB by Zia Mian


Source: FPIF (Foreign Policy in Focus),

http://fpif.org/pdf/gac/0604bomb.pdf


The United States is trying to prevent Iran from acquiring the capacity to make nuclear weapons. This is only the most recent of its seemingly endless series of battles over the past 60 years to control which other countries have access to these weapons. In this time it has failed to understand that as a nuclear-armed superpower it is as much part of the problem as part of the solution. As the Roman philosopher and statesman Seneca explained almost 2000 years ago, "Power over life and death - don't be proud of it. Whatever they fear from you, you'll be threatened with."


Non-proliferation by cooperation and consent cannot succeed as long as the United States is insistent on retaining and improving its nuclear arsenal and allowing its allies to have these weapons. By what argument can others be persuaded to give up, or not acquire, nuclear weapons? The only hope lies in a mutual recognition that all nuclear weapons are created equally evil, and there should be no room in our world for such weapons of mass destruction.


Zia Mian is a Pakistani physicist with the Program on Science and Global Security at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University and a frequent contributor to Foreign Policy In Focus. This report is a slightly revised version of an article published in Economic and Political Weekly on February 11, 2006.


See new IRC commentary online at:

http://fpif.org/fpiftxt/3175


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2. SCIENCE AND ETHICS




SUMMER INSTITUTE ON TEACHING NONPROLIFERATION


Source:The Sunflower, April 2006, Issue No. 107

http://www.wagingpeace.org/menu/resources/sunflower/2006/04_sunflower.htm#8d


Middlebury College and the Monterey Institute's Center for Nonproliferation Studies welcome applications from college faculty for the fourth annual Summer Nonproliferation Institute, to be held 21-25 June 2006, at Middlebury College. This summer workshop will provide training to faculty members interested in developing courses dealing with the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (nuclear, chemical, or biological) and related nonproliferation policies. Experts from universities, think tanks, and the US government will speak. Accepted participants will be provided free room and board and a travel stipend of up to $250. Applicants should send a current resume and a short letter of interest by 30 April 2006, to the Rohatyn Center for International Studies at cfia@middlebury.edu. E-mail applications only, please. Participants will be accepted on a rolling basis. For more information, visit: https://segue.middlebury.edu/sites/nonproliferaton.


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3. SUSTAINABILITY




SILICON VALLEY VENTURE CAPITALIST SEES BIG OPPORTUNITY IN GREEN TECHNOLOGY


Source: CBD-Headlines - 11 April 2006


SAN FRANCISCO - Venture capitalist John Doerr made his name and fortune with early investments in Netscape Communications Corp., Amazon.com Inc., Google Inc. and other pioneering tech firms that went from scrappy startups to household names.


More:

http://www.enn.com/today.html?id=10242



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UGANDA: BRITISH COMPANY SETS UP LARGE FOREST PLANTATION


Source: CBD-Headlines - 11 April 2006


A British forest company has established the largest commercial tree plantation in Uganda. The New Forests Company (NFC) leased Namwasa Central Forest Reserve, an area of 9,000 hectares from National Forest Authority (NFA) 18 months ago. However, only 6,000 hectares are plantable.


More:

http://allafrica.com/stories/200604101183.html



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KENYA: UNEP GIVES SUPPORT TO PLANNING PROGRAMME


Source: CBD-Headlines - 11 April 2006


The United Nation Environmental Programme (UNEP) has launched an Integrated Assessment and Planning (IAP) initiative to address social and environmental issues.


More:

http://allafrica.com/stories/200604110076.html


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4. NUCLEAR AND RENEWABLE ENERGIES




JAPAN BEGINS REPROCESSING SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL


Source:The Sunflower, April 2006, Issue No. 107

http://www.wagingpeace.org/menu/resources/sunflower/2006/04_sunflower.htm#8d


On 31 March 2006, the $18.6 billion Rokkasho reprocessing plant in Aomori Prefecture, Japan, began separating plutonium from spent nuclear fuel, the beginning of a 17-week test phase where 430 tons of spent fuel will be reprocessed. The plant, operated by Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd, will produce mixed oxide fuel (MOX) on an experimental basis, the first time MOX will be manufactured in Japan.


Some Japanese officials see nuclear fuel reprocessing as the answer to weaning the country off petroleum. Reprocessing is a "big step forward for Japan to get stable energy supplies," according to Japan Nuclear Fuel's President Isami Kojima. Kojima, and many Japanese officials, have failed to identify the serious hazards presented by reprocessing nuclear fuel such as proliferation, radiation exposure dangers, and significant waste disposal issues.


For more information on reprocessing, read

"Reprocessing and Proliferation Dangers" (http://www.wagingpeace.org/articles/2005/05/00_ong_reprocessing-proliferation-dangers.pdf), and  "International Concerns About Reprocessing" (http://www.wagingpeace.org/articles/2005/05/00_ong_international-concerns-about-reprocessing.pdf) both by Carah Ong, Director of Nuclear Age Peace Foundation's DC Office.


References: "Japan to Start Recycling Spent Nuclear Fuel to Trim Use of Oil," Bloomberg, 29 March 2006; "Active tests begin at Rokkasho reprocessing," Citizens' Nuclear Information Center Media Release, 31 March 2006.



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33% OF WORLD'S CIVILIAN NUCLEAR REACTORS LACK PROPER SECURITY


Source:The Sunflower, April 2006, Issue No. 107

http://www.wagingpeace.org/menu/resources/sunflower/2006/04_sunflower.htm#8d


In an interview with USA Today Linton Brooks, director of the US National Nuclear Security Administration said about 40 nuclear reactors around the world lack security upgrades needed to prevent theft of nuclear materials. Many of these unsecured reactors use highly enriched uranium (HEU), a key component used to manufacture nuclear weapons. Brooks said all the civilian reactors in the US, Russia and Eastern Europe have adequate security, saying greater security is needed at civilian nuclear facilities in China, Ghana, Pakistan and Uzbekistan, among many others.


Only 10 years ago, Brooks said, many Soviet bloc reactors were vulnerable. According to Brooks, security has improved at these sites thanks to about $1 billion in funding each year from the US to secure civilian reactors. Some of the HEU has been purchased and used as fuel in US nuclear power plants to generate electricity.


Originally from: Diamond, John, "Official Warns Of Unsecured Nuclear Reactors," USA Today, 27 March 2006.


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5. CONFERENCES AND ACTIVITIES




2006 BERLIN CONFERENCE ON THE HUMAN DIMENSIONS OF GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE


Berlin, 17-18 November 2006


The Berlin Conference Steering Committee and its partners invite papers for this year's "Berlin Conference on the Human Dimensions of Global Environmental Change". The 2006 conference will be the sixth event in the series of annual Berlin Conferences. This year's discussions will address the theme "Resource Policies: Effectiveness, Efficiency, and Equity".

Paper proposals are expected by 15 June 2006. All paper submissions will be reviewed by an international review panel. Notification of the decision will be sent by e-mail no later than 15 July 2006. Full papers are expected by 1 November 2006.


The Berlin Conference addresses the following topics:

How and how effectively are governments, public and private actors around the world addressing these problems? Given the rising demand for industrial goods, what are the potentials and limitations of strategies to increase resource productivity and the cleaning of waste streams? What are the most promising entry points for governmental interventions? Are regulatory policies, such as take-back obligations for waste, a viable instrument towards cleaner production chains? To what extent are recent efforts to develop product policies likely to be effective and efficient? To what extent are institutions by private actors such as the Stewardship Councils to protect the Marine and the Forests a promising approach? What strategies are adopted in developing countries to safeguard access to and sustainable use of natural resources and how do they work?


Plenary speakers will include Professor Paul Ekins, Policy Studies Institute London, UK, Prof. Marina Fischer-Kowalski, IFF Vienna - Department of Social Ecology, Austria, and Prof. Martin Jänicke, Freie Universitaet Berlin - Environmental Policy Research Centre, Germany. Resource Policies: Effectiveness, Efficiency, and Equity


The 2006 Berlin Conference has been endorsed by the core projects "Institutional Dimensions of Global Environmental Change" and "Industrial Transformation" of the International Human Dimensions Programme on Global Environmental Change (IHDP).

The 2006 Berlin Conference is organised by the Freie Universität Berlin (Environmental Policy Research Centre), the Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin (Department of Resource Economics), the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin) and the Institute for Ecological Economic Research (IÖW).


Further information about the 2006 Berlin Conference and the paper requirements will be available at

http://web.fu-berlin.de/ffu/akumwelt/bc2006



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10th ANNIVERSARY ICJ ADVISORY OPINION ON NUCLEAR WEAPONS


Conference in Brussels, 6-7 July 2006


The two-day conference will invite academic lawyers, representatives from NATO, parliamentarians , mayors linked with Mayors for Peace, and peace activists as participants. The intention is to identify relevant aspects of International Humanitarian Law and Treaty Obligations clarified by the Opinion and to make these available to activists in their litigation and in dialogue with politicians and officials. The proceedings will result in a publication, one of them of an academic nature, the other as a guide for activists.


The first day will concentrate on the legal implications of the Advisory Opinion with special emphasis on developments since 1996. After a review of how the Opinion was obtained, and a reminder of how nuclear weapons affect people, the majority of the day will comprise four legal topics:


- The International Humanitarian Law aspects of the Opinion,

- Jus ad bellum (the legality of initiating military action) and the Advisory Opinion,

- Nuclear Policy Concepts,

- Negotiating in good faith towards disarmament.


Each topic will be addressed by distinguished speakers from a wide spectrum of viewpoints.


The second day will examine the various options for a another request to the ICJ for a fresh ruling about the legal status of nuclear weapons in the light of developments over the last ten years. There will be a general presentation about the ICJ as an instrument which can be used by activists. The afternoon session will present civil society initiatives linked with a Return to the ICJ. A considerable period of time will be put aside for discussion between attenders and speakers.


There will be ample opportunity for participation from the floor. Please let us know if you are interested in attending and we will update you with further details, including suggestions for reasonably-priced accommodation, as they become available.


Main contact person: George Farebrother:

geowcpuk@gn.apc.org


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6. DOCUMENTATIONS




HEALTH EFFECTS OF CHERNOBYL


The Chernobyl catastrophe changed the world. Millions of people were made victims overnight. Gigantic stretches of land were made uninhabitable. The radioactive cloud spread all over the world. An understanding of the dangers of the use of nuclear energy grew in a countless number of minds. Even in Germany, people became sick and died due to the radiation they incorporated into their bodies through eating and breathing. An analysis of the effects of Chernobyl is massively handicapped by the number of very varying levels of facts. Essential data on the course of events of the catastrophe and its health effects are not publicly available.


English summary of the Study of IPPNW Germany

http://www.ippnw-europe.org/main/Health%20Effects%20of%20Chernobyl.pdf