INES WEEKLY INFORMATION SERVICE


The International Network of Engineers and Scientists for Global Responsibility (INES) is an independent non-profit-organization concerned about the impact of science and technology on society. INES was founded in 1991. INES' efforts focus on disarmament and international peace, ethics, justice and sustainable development. INES is affiliated with the United Nations an with UNESCO as a NON-Governmental Organization (NGO). INES has become a network of nearly 100 organisations and individual members.


The "What's New In INES" (wnii) is the main communication instrument of INES. It shall give the member organisations the possibility to publish their articles, and serve at the same time as a general overview of related international news.


Editor: Kristin Kropidlowski: wnii@inesglobal.com

WNII is archived under: http://www.inesglobal.com/whats_new_in_ines/Whats_new_in_ines_main.html

INES official site: http://inesglobal.com

INES international Office: ines.office@web.de

INES Chair: Claus Montonen: claus.montonen@helsinki.fi


The recent issue of the INES newsletter is available at:

http://www.inesglobal.com/newsletter/Newletter_main.html



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Topics, WNII, Issue No. 2/2006, January 2006



1. WAR AND PEACE - ARMS RACE AND DISARMAMENT


- In Focus: Iran's Nuclear Programm


- Wrong Ends, Means, and Needs: Behind the U.S. Nuclear Deal With India by Zia Mian and M. V. Ramana


- Spotlights on Middle East, but Blind Eye to Indo-Pakistan Nuclear Arms Race by MB Naqvi


- Nothing depleted about "depleted uranium". Disturbing photos of children by Abel Bult-Ito


- New Blog on Disarmament and Related Issues



2. SCIENCE AND ETHICS


- NASA scientist claims he's been silenced



3. SUSTAINABILITY


- 2005 Was Warmest Year on Record - NASA by Deborah Zabarenko


- Energy gap: Crisis for humanity? by Richard Black



4. NUCLEAR AND RENEWABLE ENERGIES


- "Decision time" on Nuclear Power


- Bush to discuss nuclear energy in State of Union



5. CONFERENCES AND ACTIVITIES


- Chernobyl 20, International Conference "Twenty Years after Chornobyl Accident. Future Outlook", Kiev, Ukraine, 24-26 April 2006



6. DOCUMENTATIONS


- Disposal of Long-Lived Highly Radioactive Wastes in France: An IEER Evaluation by Arjun and Annie Makhijani



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1. WAR AND PEACE - ARMSRACE AND DISARMAMENT




IN FOCUS: IRAN'S NUCLEAR PROGRAMM


Updated news, ressources and more concerning Iran's nuclear ambitions are available at:

http://www.carnegieendowment.org/npp/country/index.cfm?fa=view&id=1000089



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WRONG ENDS, MEANS, AND NEEDS: BEHIND THE U.S. NUCLEAR DEAL WITH INDIA by Zia Mian and M. V. Ramana


Source: http://www.armscontrol.org/act/2006_01-02/JANFEB-IndiaFeature.asp


President George W. Bush and Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh issued a joint statement on July 18, 2005, laying the grounds for the resumption of full U.S. and international nuclear aid to India. Such international support was key to India developing its nuclear infrastructure and capabilities and was essentially stopped after India's 1974 nuclear weapons test. India's subsequent refusal to give up its nuclear weapons and sign the nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) has kept it largely outside the system of regulated transfer, trade, and monitoring of nuclear technology that has been developed over the last three decades.


The July agreement requires the United States to amend its own laws and policies on nuclear technology transfer and to work for changes in international controls on the supply of nuclear fuel and technology so as to allow "full civil nuclear energy cooperation and trade with India". In exchange, India's government would identify and separate civilian nuclear facilities and programs from its nuclear weapons complex and volunteer these civilian facilities for International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspection and safeguarding. Yet, as they consider the deal and ways to transform its broad framework into legal realities, political elites in each country have ignored some crucial issues.


The unabridged article you will find at:

http://www.armscontrol.org/act/2006_01-02/JANFEB-IndiaFeature.asp



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SPOTLIGHTS ON MIDDLE EAST, BUT BLIND EYE TP INDO-PAKISTAN NUCLEAR ARMS RACE by MB Naqvi


Source: http://perso.wanadoo.fr/sacw/saan/2006/mbNaqvi23012006.html


While many in the world are greatly exercised by nuclear weapons proliferation in the Middle East, there is the nuclear arms race spiraling up all the time between India and Pakistan. Hardly a day passes either of them tests on adapted missile. Why do they do these tests? Is it not to see if the adaptation for the new warhead is successful?


True, not many are talking about this arms race largely because of two reasons. There is little that anyone can do anything meaningful about the populous South Asia. Secondly, all others have left it to the sole superpower to tackle this problem and which is doing it its own way.


In practice, the US has made both countries its allies - of different kinds. It is in a close alliance with Pakistan in its War on Terror. It is also assiduously cultivating India, promising all manner of aid to it under a Military Cooperation Framework agreement with a view to enabling it to become a major global power. The US has also agreed to sell India up to eight civilian nuclear reactors for power generation on the condition of putting all its civilian nuclear programme under IAEA inspections after separating it from its military-oriented programme. This would enable India to enjoy all the privileges of a recognized nuclear state without signing the NPT. This implied, indeed de facto, recognition of being a nuclear power would mean the lifting of all sanctions on it without paying much of a price.



The full article is available under:

http://perso.wanadoo.fr/sacw/saan/2006/mbNaqvi23012006.html.



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NOTHING DEPLETED ABOUT "DEPLETED URANIUM". DISTURBING PHOTOS OF CHILDREN by Abel Bult-Ito


Source: http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=viewArticle&code=BUL20060122&articleId=1777


Iraqi and visiting doctors, and a number of news reports, have reported that birth defects and cancers in Iraqi children have increased five-to 10-fold since the 1991 Gulf War and continue to increase sharply, to over 30-fold in some areas in southern Iraq. Currently, more than 50 percent of Iraqi cancer patients are children under the age of 5, up from 13 percent. Children are especially vulnerable because they tend to play in areas that are heavily polluted by depleted uranium.


The Pentagon has been using radiooactive weapons for at least a decade and a half with full complicity of at least three White House administrations and Republican and Democratic congressional legislators. Conservatively, at least 300 tons and 1,700 tons of depleted uranium were used in the Gulf War and the current Iraq War, resectively. This is about 70 grams of depleted uranium per Iraqi citizen, and if inhaled or ingested, it is enough to kill them all.


Is this not radioactive genocide, especially when our troops used and continue to use most of the depleted uranium munitions in densely populated areas such as Baghdad and Fallujah?


Read more: http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=viewArticle&code=BUL20060122&articleId=1777


(Originally from: www.news-miner.com and www.uruknet.info)



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NEW BLOG ON DISARMAMENT


An interesting new blog with commentary on disarmament and related issues you will at:

http://www.disarmamentactivist.org/




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2. SCIENCE AND ETHICS




NASA SCIENTIST CLAIMS HE'S BEEN SILENCED


Source: http://seven.com.au/news/topstories/139292


NASA's top climate scientist said the Bush administration has tried to stop him from speaking out since he gave a lecture in December calling for prompt reductions in emissions of greenhouse gases, The New York Times said.


In an interview with the newspaper, James Hansen, director of NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies, said that officials at the space agency's headquarters had ordered the public affairs staff to review his lectures, papers, postings on the Goddard website and requests for interviews from journalists.


"They feel their job is to be this censor of information going out to the public," the Times quoted Hansen as saying, adding that the scientist planned to ignore the new restrictions.


A NASA spokesman denied any effort to silence Hansen, the Times said. "That's not the way we operate here at NASA," said Dean Acosta, deputy assistant administrator for public affairs."We promote openness and we speak with the facts."


Read the whole story: http://seven.com.au/news/topstories/139292


(Copyright 2006 Reuters)



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3. SUSTAINABILITY




2005 WAS WARMEST YEAR ON RECORD - NASA by Deborah Zabarenko


Source: http://www.planetark.com/dailynewsstory.cfm/newsid/34662/story.htm


WASHINGTON - Last year was the warmest recorded on Earth's surface, and it was unusually hot in the Arctic, US space agency.

All five of the hottest years since modern record-keeping began in the 1890s occurred within the last decade, according to analysis by NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies. In descending order, the years with the highest global average annual temperatures were 2005, 1998, 2002, 2003 and 2004, NASA said in a statement. "It's fair to say that it probably is the warmest since we have modern meteorological records," said Drew Shindell of the NASA institute in New York City. "Using indirect measurements that go back farther, I think it's even fair to say that it's the warmest in the last several thousand years."


Some researchers had expected 1998 would be the hottest year on record, notably because a strong El Nino - a warm-water pattern in the eastern Pacific - boosted global temperatures. But Shindell said last year was slightly warmer than 1998, even without any extraordinary weather pattern. Temperatures in the Arctic were unusually warm in 2005, NASA said. "That very anomalously warm year (1998) has become the norm," Shindell said in a telephone interview. "The rate of warming has been so rapid that this temperature that we only got when we had a real strong El Nino now has become something that we've gotten without any unusual worldwide weather disturbance."


Over the past 30 years, Earth has warmed by 1.08 degrees F (0.6 degrees C), NASA said. Over the past 100 years, it has warmed by 1.44 degrees F (0.8 degrees C). Shindell, in line with the view held by most scientists, attributed the rise to emissions of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and ozone, with the burning of fossil fuels being the primary source. The 21st century could see global temperature increases of 6 to 10 degrees F (3 to 5 degrees C), Shindell said.


To understand whether the Earth is cooling or warming, scientists use data from weather stations on land, satellite measurements of sea surface temperature since 1982, and data from ships for earlier years.


More information and images are available online at:

www.nasa.gov/vision/earth/environment/2005_warmest.html



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ENERGY GAP: CRISIS FOR HUMANITY? by Richard Black


Source: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/4648710.stm


It is perhaps too early to talk of an energy "crisis". But take your pick from terms like "serious concern" and "major issue" and you will not be far from the positions which analysts are increasingly adopting. The reason for their concern can be found in a set of factors which are pulling in glaringly different directions:


- Demand for energy, in all its forms, is rising


- Supplies of key fuels - notably oil and gas - show signs of decline


- Mainstream climate science suggests that reducing greenhouse gas emissions within two decades would be a prudent thing to do


- Meanwhile the Earth's population continues to rise, with the majority of its six billion people hankering after a richer lifestyle - which means a greater consumption of energy.


Underlying the growing concern is the relentless pursuit of economic growth, which historically has been tied to energy consumption as closely as a horse is tethered to its cart.


It is a vehicle which cannot continue to speed up indefinitely; it must at some point hit a barrier, of finite supply, unfeasibly high prices or abrupt climate change.


The immediate question is whether the crash comes soon, or whether humanity has time to plan a comfortable way out.


Even if it can, the planning is not necessarily going to be easy, or result in cheap solutions. Every energy source has its downside; there is no free lunch, wherever you look on the menu.


For the unabridged article please visit:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/4648710.stm



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4. NUCLEAR AND RENEWABLE ENERGIES




"DECISION TIME" ON NUCLEAR POWER


Source: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/4638610.stm


It is time to decide to "close... or open the door" to nuclear power, Trade Secretary Alan Johnson has said.

He said the 2003 Energy White Paper "had rightly" focused on boosting renewable energy and energy efficiency, but left the door "ajar" on nuclear. But, as a public consultation into UK future energy needs begins, he said it was time to take a decision on nuclear.


Critics say nuclear power is too expensive, is a terror threat and creates much radioactive waste. Mr Johnson spoke out as it emerged that ministers had asked the Health and Safety Executive to look at the safety, cost and suitability of existing nuclear plants. Environmental campaigners fear the HSE study is a prelude to an expansion of Britain's nuclear network.


To read the whole story visit BBC NEWS:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/1/hi/uk_politics/4638610.stm.


Related news you will find at:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/4637326.stm and http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/4639574.stm.



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BUSH TO DISCUSS NUCLEAR ENERGY IN STATE OF UNION


Source: http://www.boycottbush.org/nieuwsinh_nl.php?aid=184&begin=0&sel=0


WASHINGTON, Jan 27 (Reuters) - President George W. Bush plans to promote nuclear energy as a way of reducing U.S. oil dependence when he delivers his State of the Union address next week, the White House said on Friday.


"We've been talking with a number of countries about how to move forward on expanding nuclear energy to meet our global energy needs," White House spokesman Scott McClellan told reporters.

"It's an energy source that is clean, it helps us address economic and -- it helps us address our energy and national security need," he said. "The president is very focused on this matter and has talked about it previously."


Asked if Bush would bring this up in the State of the Union address on Tuesday night, McClellan said, "Yes."

Reports in the Washington Post and Wall Street Journal have said the Bush administration is considering proposals to expand civilian nuclear energy and are looking at initiatives to reprocess spent nuclear fuel.


(Originally from: AlertNet / Reuters)


For detailed informations and take action please see:

http://www.wagingpeace.org/menu/about/media-center/mailers/2006/state-of-the-union/index.htm



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5. CONFERENCES AND ACTIVITIES




CHERNOBYL 20

International Conference "Twenty Years after Chornobyl Accident. Future Outlook"

Kiev, Ukraine, 24-26 April 2006


Source: http://www.inesglobal.com


The 26th of April 2006 will be the 20th anniversary of the Chernobyl accident. With the aim of effective use of the experience gained for strengthening of nuclear safety around the world, the International Conference "Twenty years after Chernobyl accident. Future Outlook" will be held.


The Chernobyl catastrophe resulted in the essential changes not only in Ukraine, Belarus, Russia, but also in the whole world. The catastrophe had a serious political impact and changed attitudes towards nuclear energy all over the world. International regulations and standards for radioactive protection, national strategies for nuclear energy development, nuclear safety and radioactive waste management have been substantially revised. After 20 years of the Chernobyl catastrophe it is now important to analyse effectiveness of measures taken during the period following the tragedy, to review the work accomplished over the last decades and to outline an action plan for future.


The Conference will be organized by the Government of Ukraine represented by the Ministry of Emergencies and Affairs of Population Protection from the Consequences of Chornobyl Catastrophe (MOE) in co-operation with Governments of Belarus and

Russian Federation, UNDP, IAEA, UNESCO, WHO, European Commission, Council of Europe, European Centre of Technological Safety, IRSN (France), and GRS (Germany). This Conference will be the last event in the sequence of conferences devoted to the 20th anniversary of Chornobyl accident. Conclusions of International Conferences "Chernobyl: Looking Back to Go Forwards" (6-7 September 2005, Vienna) and "Chernobyl after 20 years. Strategy for rehabilitation and sustainable development of affected areas" (19-21 April 2006, Minsk) will be presented at the Conference.


The Conference will promote an effective implementation of recent international expertise on the following issues:


- radiation protection of population and environment, minimization of consequences of Chernobyl accident;


- medical and biological consequences of radiological accidents, Chernobyl experience;


- improvements of effectiveness of response to radiological accidents;


- economic and legal problems in radioactive waste management, nuclear power plants decommissioning, and radiological accidents response;


- radioactive waste management, Chernobyl experience;


- nuclear power plants decommissioning, Chernobyl NPP decommissioning;


- transformation of the 4th Unit "Shelter" into ecologically safe system.


Working languages of the Conference will be Ukrainian, Russian and English. Proceedings of the Conference will be published. European Centre of Technological Safety (TESEC) has been selected as the Secretariat of the Conference. Abstracts of intended contributed papers (length less then 2 pages paper size A4, font Times New Roman size 12, 1? spaced, with a reference made to one of the conference themes) are to be submitted to the Conference Secretariat by 20 November 2005.



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6. DOCUMENTATIONS




CISPOSAL OF LONG-LIVED HIGHLY WASTES IN FRANCE: AN IEER EVALUATION by Arjun and Annie Makhijani


Source: Newsletter "Science for Demoratic Action", Vol. 13, No. 4, Jan. 2006


France is often held up by nuclear power advocates in the United States and elsewhere as a model of energy development, not only because it gets almost 80 percent of its electricity from nuclear power plants, but also because it reprocesses most of its spent nuclear fuel to extract plutonium for reuse as fuel. Yet, France has a considerable volume of long-lived, highly radioactive waste that is slated for disposal in a deep geologic repository, including vitrified high-level waste from reprocessing, unreprocessed uranium spent fuel, unreprocessed mixed oxide (MOX) spent fuel, and some other long-lived wastes of lower specific activity.2 MOX spent fuel arises from the use of reprocessed plutonium as a reactor fuel.


The 1991 French law on nuclear waste mandates, among other things, investigation of deep geologic disposal. In 2003, the Institute for Energy and Environmental Research (IEER) was retained by the Comité local d'information et de suivi (CLIS) of Bure to conduct an evaluation of French geologic repository research program for disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. The CLIS is an official stakeholder group, consisting of local and national elected officials and non-government leaders.


Download the Newsletter: http://www.ieer.org/sdafiles/13-4.pdf