INES INFORMATION SERVICE, What's New In INES (WNII), Issue 1, January 2008


The International Network of Engineers and Scientists for Global Responsibility (INES) is an independent non-profit-organization concerned about the impact of science and technology on society. INES was founded in 1991. INES' efforts focus on disarmament and international peace, ethics, justice and sustainable development. INES is affiliated with the United Nations and with UNESCO as a NON-Governmental Organization (NGO). INES has become a network of nearly 100 organisations and individual members.


The "What's New In INES" (WNII) is one of the main communication instrument of INES. It shall give the member organisations the possibility to publish their articles, and serve at the same time as a general overview of related international news.


Editor: Kristin Kropidlowski, NEW ADRESS ines.news@gmx.de

INES Official Site, http://inesglobal.com

INES International Office, ines.office@web.de

INES Chair: David Krieger, dkrieger@napf.org 


PLEASE REMEMBER: To meet the WNII-criteria (main communication instrument, general news overview) it is necessarily required that the members of INES use it as a communication tool. Please DO NOT HESITATE of just forwarding important news including conference and activity informations, outstanding documentations as well as announcements. 



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Contents and Hotlinks, INES, WNII, Issue 1, January 2008



1. INES ACTIVITIES AND PUBLICATIONS


· At the Nuclear Tipping Point by David Krieger


· Nuclear power - Resources from Scientists for Global Responsibility


· Catastrophic Climatic Consequences of Nuclear Conflict by Steven Starr,

http://www.inesap.org/bulletin28/IB28_Starr.pdf



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2. WAR AND PEACE - ARMSRACE AND DISARMAMENT



- IN FOCUS: KENYA


· Q&A: Kenya Poll Violence, 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/7165962.stm


· Kenya Protesters to Mount Boycott, 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/7195307.stm


· UN Warns of Worsening Humanitarian Crisis in Post-election Kenya,

http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=25229&Cr=kenya&Cr1=


· 250,000 Kenyans Displaced by Post-electoral Violence, UN Estimates,

http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=25209&Cr=kenya&Cr1



- MISSILE DEFENSE


· Czechs Oppose US Missile Defense Plans



- PERSPECTIVES


· Japan's Role in Building Peace in the Nuclear Age by David Krieger,

http://www.wagingpeace.org/articles/2007/12/20_krieger_japan_peace.php


· Research Shows that War Isn't Caused by Instinct by Bill Wickersham,

http://www.wagingpeace.org/articles/2007/12/27_wickersham_war_instinct.php



- NUCLEAR PROLIFERATION AND THREAT


· Asleep at the Controls by Kofi Annan,

http://www.monitor.upeace.org/innerpg.cfm?id_article=470


· U.S. Says Iran Ended Atomic Arms Work by Mark Mazezetti,

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/03/world/middleeast/03cnd-iran.html



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3. NUCLEAR AND RENEWABLE ENERGIES



- ALTERNATIVE ENERGY


· China Boosts Forest Based Bioenergy Projects,

http://www.checkbiotech.org/green_News_Biofuels.aspx?infoId=16713


· Toward a Nuclear-Free World by George P. Shultz, William J. Perry, Henry A. Kissinger and Sam Nunn,

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB120036422673589947.html?mod=opinion_main_commentaries


· Nuclear power is not the answer, FoE Press Release,

http://www.foe.co.uk/resource/press_releases/nuclear_power_is_not_the_a_09012008.html


· 'Sustainable' Palm Oil Advert False, Says Advertising Standards Authority, FoE Press Release,

http://www.foe.co.uk/resource/press_releases/sustainable_palm_oil_adver_09012008.html



- NUCLEAR POWER


· Green Solutions Undermined by Nuclear Decision, FoE Press Release,

http://www.foe.co.uk/resource/press_releases/green_solutions_undermined_10012008.html


· Is Nuclear Power the Answer to Global Warming?


· GAO Concerned with Safety at Nuclear Weapon Labs by Eric Fiegel and Kathy Benz,

http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/11/28/gao.nuke.safety/index.html



- NUCLEAR WASTE


· Groups Testify on Impact of Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Transportation and Storage,

http://www.commondreams.org/news2007/1205-24.htm



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4. SUSTAINABILITY AND CLIMATE CHANGE


· 80% of World's Undernourished Children Live in 10% of Countries by Morgan Erickson-Davis,

http://today.reuters.com/news/articlenews.aspx?type=healthNews&storyid=2008-01-17T235222Z_01_N17247644_RTRUKOC_0_US-VITAMIN-CORN.xml



- SUSTAINABLE FARMING


· Scientists Find Way to Increase Corn's Vitamin A by Will Dunham,

http://www.guardian.co.uk/feedarticle?id=7231125



- CLIMATE CHANGE


· Germany Reiterates Climate Goals, Challenges EU to Act,

http://www.dw-world.de/dw/article/0,2144,3071483,00.html


· Can Crops be Climate-proofed?,

http://www.scidev.net/content/features/eng/can-crops-be-climate-proofed.cfm


· EU Rethinks Biofuels Guidelines by Roger Harrabin,

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/7186380.stm



- GREENER LIFE


· New Year's Resolutions: Go Green for a Great 2008!, FoE Press Release,

http://www.foe.co.uk/resource/press_releases/new_years_resolutions_go_g_21122007.html



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5. SCIENCE AND ETHICS


· National Science Board Science and Engineering Indicators 2008,

http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewsr.html?pid=26695



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6. CONFERENCE


· "Progress and Prospects on Water: For a Clean and Healthy World",

http://www.worldwaterweek.org/



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7. TAKE ACTION


· Nominate for Nobel Peace Prize -  Reclaim the Nobel Peace Prize



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8. ANNOUNCEMENTS


· Disarmanent Forum,

http://www.unidir.org/html/en/disarmament_forum.php


· Job Vacancy



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9. BOOK RECOMMENDATION


· Jonathan Schell's New Book on the Nuclear Dilemma by David Krieger



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1. INES ACTIVITIES AND PUBLICATIONS



· At the Nuclear Tipping Point by David Krieger


The latest Wall Street Journal article by George Shultz, William Perry, Henry Kissinger and Sam Nunn, "Toward a Nuclear-Free World," published on January 15, 2008, has a greater sense of urgency than their first joint article a year earlier.  They find that we are at a nuclear "tipping point" with "a very real possibility that the deadliest weapons ever invented could fall into dangerous hands." As if these weapons are not already in dangerous enough hands. The former policy makers and Cold Warriors are warning us that, without change, nuclear dangers will worsen. They leave to our imaginations what will happen in a world in which "deterrence is decreasingly effective and increasingly hazardous."


We can no longer count on the threat of retaliation with overwhelming nuclear force to prevent those unnamed dangerous hands from detonating nuclear weapons in our cities or the cities of our friends and allies. In other words, our nuclear weapons cannot be relied upon to prevent nuclear attacks against us. It is not like the tense days of the Cold War, when at least we knew who the enemy was and where he was located. Now we have shadowy and slippery enemies and our thermonuclear weapons provide no defense against such enemies. Actually, they never did, even during the Cold War. Deterrence is not defense - it is only a psychological pseudo-barrier, a wish and a prayer. Against nuclear weapons, there is no defense, not even so-called missile defenses, which are easily overcome.


Even Henry Kissinger gets it now and is speaking out, or at least lending his name, to the goal of a world free of nuclear weapons. Zero nuclear weapons.  None for anyone, including us. The US must lead the way, must convene the other nuclear powers. There are steps that must be taken, which the former policy makers outline. Their suggestions are sensible, although they do not go far enough, nor is there any real hope that Washington under the Bush administration will respond to them rapidly enough. The situation may be even more urgent than the former Cold Warriors grasp.  


Nuclear weapons do not make us safer. They leave us more exposed. They are military equalizers. Minor foes, terrorist groups and small countries, can inflict horrendous damage on even the most powerful states.  What is to be done?  The Cold Warriors offer the following: Work with Russia to move toward a world free of nuclear weapons by saving the Strategic Arms Reductions Treaty of 1991; pursue further reductions in nuclear arms than agreed upon in the Strategic Offensive Reductions Treaty; increase warning and decision times for the launch of nuclear-armed ballistic missiles; discard Cold War plans for massive attacks; develop cooperative multilateral ballistic missile defense and early warning systems; secure nuclear weapons, including those designed for forward deployment, and weapons-grade nuclear materials; strengthen monitoring of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty; and bring the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty into force.  


The Cold Warriors also call for broadening the dialogue on an international scale. Here they will find that many countries without nuclear weapons have been trying to send a message to the nuclear weapons states for a long time, urging them to do all that the former Cold Warriors seek and more.. Progress has been blocked since the end of the Cold War by the lack of political will of US leaders. That is where it continues to be blocked. The Bush administration's approach to a world free of nuclear weapons is to place as many obstacles in its way as possible.  


As the Cold Warriors point out, "Progress must be facilitated by a clear statement of our ultimate goal." They have made that statement. It is doubtful, though, if it will have any effect on the current US administration, perhaps the darkest, most criminal administration in US history. Mr. Kissinger and his colleagues must look beyond George W. Bush, and hope for a new president of the United States who will be prepared to climb the mountain with them, rather than trying to blow it up.  But they are absolutely right to speak up now, and to continue to strongly promote the goal of a world free of nuclear weapons. As Albert Camus said immediately after the bombing of Hiroshima, "Before the terrifying prospects now available to humanity, we see even more clearly that peace is the only battle worth waging.." Wage on, Henry Kissinger!



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· Nuclear Power - Resources from Scientists for Global Responsibility


Jan 7, 2008 - With the government due to make an announcement on the future of nuclear power in the UK, Scientists for Global Responsibility (SGR) reiterates its opposition to the building of new nuclear power

stations. Below are links to a selection of SGR's recent resources on this issue, laying out our case.


Nuclear power: the security dimension Powerpoint presentation (October 2007)

http://www.sgr.org.uk/climate/NucPower_Kendal07.ppt


The future of nuclear power SGR response to government's consultation document (October 2007)

http://www.sgr.org.uk/climate/response_nuclearcons_oct07.html


Nuclear power: yes or no? Powerpoint presentation (September 2007)

http://www.sgr.org.uk/climate/NucPower_manc07.ppt


Not enough skilled workers to build new UK nuclear power stations? Comment article (July 2006)

http://www.sgr.org.uk/climate/article_NuclearScientists_31jul06.html


Open Letter to Prime Minister regarding opposition to a new generation of nuclear power stations in the UK from 40 climate and energy experts (April 2006)

http://www.sgr.org.uk/climate/letter_TonyBlair_NucPower_10apr06.html


For more information, please contact: Dr Stuart Parkinson, stuartp@sgr.org.uk



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· Catastrophic Climatic Consequences of Nuclear Conflict by Steven Starr


U.S. researchers have confirmed the scientific validity of the concept of "nuclear winter" and have demonstrated that any conflict which targets even a tiny fraction of the global nuclear arsenal against large urban centers will cause catastrophic disruptions of the global climate.


New studies show that a "regional" nuclear conflict, which targeted large population centers in the sub-tropics with 100 Hiroshima-size weapons - about 0.3% of the global nuclear arsenal - could produce as many fatalities as World War II1 and would significantly disrupt the global climate for at least a decade.2 Following this "small"  exchange, the world would rapidly experience cold conditions not felt since pre-industrial times.


Download the article (pdf) here: http://www.inesap.org/bulletin28/IB28_Starr.pdf


Source: INESAP Information Bulletin 28, January 2008



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2. WAR AND PEACE - ARMSRACE AND DISARMAMENT



- IN FOCUS: KENYA


· Q&A: Kenya Poll Violence


http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/7165962.stm



· Kenya Protesters to Mount Boycott


Jan 18, 2008 - Kenya's opposition says it will boycott companies run by allies of President Mwai Kibaki in protest at the outcome of last month's presidential election.


To read the article, visit: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/7195307.stm



· UN Warns of Worsening Humanitarian Crisis in Post-election Kenya


Jan 7, 2008 - United Nations officials warned today that the humanitarian situation in Kenya, where post-election violence has uprooted hundreds of thousands of people, is getting worse with water, sanitation and shelter among the most pressing needs.


Read: http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=25229&Cr=kenya&Cr1=



· 250,000 Kenyans Displaced by Post-electoral Violence, UN Estimates


Jan 4, 2008 - Some 250,000 Kenyans are now estimated to have been displaced by post-electoral violence, United Nations humanitarian officials reported today, as the world body's independent human rights experts voiced deep concern at the ethnic dimension of the conflict.


More: http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=25209&Cr=kenya&Cr1



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- MISSILE DEFENSE



· Czechs Oppose US Missile Defense Plans


Dec 17, 2007 - A new poll shows that 68% of adults in the Czech Republic oppose the construction of a US missile defense base in their country, and 73% believe the issue should be decided by a referendum.


In January 2007, the US issued a formal request to place a radar base in the Czech Republic as well as 10 interceptor missiles in Poland.


Washington claims that the project is intended to protect the US and its European allies from a potential attack by Iran or North Korea. Many believe the missile defense program is actually targeted at Russia.


"Czechs Still Oppose US Missile Shield, Want Vote," Angus Reid Global Monitor, December 17, 2007.


Source: Sunflower eNewsletter, January 2008



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- PERSPECTIVES



· Japan's Role in Building Peace in the Nuclear Age by David Krieger


One of the key formative events in my own life, placing me on the path to work for peace and a nuclear weapons-free world, was an early visit at the age of 21 to the Hiroshima and Nagasaki Peace Memorial Museums. At these museums, I learned a lesson that was not part of my education in the United States. In the US, we were taught the perspective of those above the bombs. It was a story of scientific and technological triumph, a story of victors with little reference to loss of life and the suffering of the victims. At the Peace Memorial Museums in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, it was a human story, a tragedy of massive death and destruction. It was a story told from the perspective of those beneath the bombs, and a warning about our common future: we must eliminate these weapons before they eliminate us. 


To read the full article, visit: http://www.wagingpeace.org/articles/2007/12/20_krieger_japan_peace.php


Source: Sunflower eNewsletter, January 2008



· Research Shows that War Isn't Caused by Instinct by Bill Wickersham 


When writing or speaking on issues of war and peace, it is not unusual for pundits and others to make the case that war is due primarily to a human instinct that causes nation-states to engage in large scale warfare. Underlying that idea is the notion that human beings have pugnacious inner drives that require an outlet for aggressive behavior if they are to achieve their full potential in a highly competitive world in which people have to dominate others to guarantee their own survival. This theory is often linked to the psychologically and physiologically induced fight-flight reaction process, which provides the necessary adrenaline rush when we are aggressively confronted or personally attacked and enables us to stand and fight or, alternatively, to quickly flee the scene. Conventional wisdom often cites this reaction as the underlying cause for the violent, deadly, large group activity called war.


To read the full article, visit: http://www.wagingpeace.org/articles/2007/12/27_wickersham_war_instinct.php


Source: Sunflower eNewsletter, January 2008



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- NUCLEAR PROLIFERATION AND THREAT



· Asleep at the Controls by Kofi Annan


Kofi Annan on the importance of balancing disarmament and non-proliferation for international security.


For the speech, click here: http://www.monitor.upeace.org/innerpg.cfm?id_article=470



· U.S. Says Iran Ended Atomic Arms Work by Mark Mazezetti


Dec 3, 2007 - A new assessment by American intelligence agencies concludes that Iran halted its nuclear weapons program in 2003 and that the program remains frozen, contradicting judgment two years ago that Tehran was working relentlessly toward building a nuclear bomb.


Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/03/world/middleeast/03cnd-iran.html



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3. NUCLEAR AND RENEWABLE ENERGIES



- ALTERNATIVE ENERGY



· China Boosts Forest Based Bioenergy Projects


Jan 18, 2008 - Persistent high oil prices and rapidly growing dependence on imported oil prompt China to further invest in biofuels that yield environmental benefits besides fuel. Forestry administrators told state media they will be planting nearly 7,000 hectares of oilseed bearing trees in the northern province of Hebei this year, part of a much larger national campaign to fuel the fast growing economy in a greener way.


More: http://www.checkbiotech.org/green_News_Biofuels.aspx?infoId=16713



· Toward a Nuclear-Free World by George P. Shultz, William J. Perry, Henry A. Kissinger and Sam Nunn


Jan 15, 2008 - The accelerating spread of nuclear weapons, nuclear know-how and nuclear material has brought us to a nuclear tipping point. We face a very real possibility that the deadliest weapons ever invented could fall into dangerous hands.


For the article, click here: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB120036422673589947.html?mod=opinion_main_commentaries



· Nuclear Power is Not the Answer, FoE Press Release


Jan 9, 2008 - Building a new generation of nuclear power stations is not the answer to the UK's energy problems and will do little to help tackle climate change, Friends of the Earth warned today. The environmental campaign group said that the Government's focus on nuclear power is a distraction from developing real and sustainable solutions, such as a major programme of renewables and energy efficiency, and more efficient use of fossil fuels, including combined heat and Power (CHP). The Government is expected to give the go-ahead to a new generation of nuclear plants tomorrow (Thursday). 


Please click here: http://www.foe.co.uk/resource/press_releases/nuclear_power_is_not_the_a_09012008.html



· 'Sustainable' Palm Oil Advert False, Says Advertising Standards Authority, FoE Press Release


Jan 9, 2008 - Friends of the Earth has today welcomed a decision by the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) in which palm oil described as "sustainably produced" was ruled to be false advertising. The verdict followed a Friends of the Earth International complaint against an advert by the Malaysian Palm Oil Council. The advertising watchdog is the latest in a series of bodies to question palm oil's sustainability, furthering concerns about EU plans to import vast quantities of it for use as a biofuel.


More: http://www.foe.co.uk/resource/press_releases/sustainable_palm_oil_adver_09012008.html



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- NUCLEAR POWER



· Green Solutions Undermined by Nuclear Decision, FoE Press Release


Jan 10, 2007 - Today's decision to give the go-ahead to a new generation of nuclear power stations will undermine safe and sustainable solutions to Britain's energy problems and will do little to tackle climate change, Friends of the Earth warned today. 


More: http://www.foe.co.uk/resource/press_releases/green_solutions_undermined_10012008.html



· Is Nuclear Power the Answer to Global Warming?


This brief leaflet argues that nuclear power is not the answer to global warming and summarizes 10 arguments against nuclear power. 


The leaflet can be found at: http://www.greenhealth.org.uk/NuclearLeaflet.htm.


Source: Sunflower e-Newsletter, January 2008



· GAO Concerned with Safety at Nuclear Weapon Labs by Eric Fiegel and Kathy Benz


Nov 28, 2007 - The nation's three nuclear weapons laboratories have had almost 60 serious accidents or near misses in the past seven years, according to a report released Wednesday by the Government Accountability Office..


More: http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/11/28/gao.nuke.safety/index.html



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- NUCLEAR WASTE



· Groups Testify on Impact of Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Transportation and Storage


Dec 5, 2007 - At a Department of Energy (DOE) hearing today, a coalition of environmental and security groups detailed their concerns over the proposed plan to transport nuclear waste to Yucca Mountain, Nevada for storage. Citing serious security, environmental, and public health threats associated with shipping nuclear waste through residential areas across the United States, the groups stated that the Yucca Mountain plan has fundamental flaws and should not go forward. 


More: http://www.commondreams.org/news2007/1205-24.htm



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4. SUSTAINABILITY AND CLIMATE CHANGE



· 80% of World's Undernourished Children Live in 10% of Countries by Morgan Erickson-Davis


Jan 17, 2008 - Drastic change necessary in the fight against child undernutrition. Worldwide, undernutrition is responsible for more than a third of all deaths of children under the age of five. If a child survives past this age, he or she is much more likely than a child adequately nourished to demonstrate lower educational achievement, be of below-average height, and give birth to smaller infants.


More: http://news.mongabay.com/2008/0117-morgan_poverty.html



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- SUSTAINABLE FARMING



· Scientists Find Way to Increase Corn's Vitamin A by Will Dunham


Jan 17, 2008 - U.S. scientists have developed a way to breed corn that can boost the vitamin A it gives people who eat it -- a potentially important advance for regions of the world burdened by vitamin A deficiencies.


Vitamin A deficiency is an important cause of eye disease and other health problems in developing countries.


Read here: http://today.reuters.com/news/articlenews.aspx?type=healthNews&storyid=2008-01-17T235222Z_01_N17247644_RTRUKOC_0_US-VITAMIN-CORN.xml



· Dutch Minister Calls for More Sustainable Farming by Catherine Hornby


Jan 16, 2008 - Livestock farming in the Netherlands must become more sustainable in the next 15 years, Dutch Agriculture Minister Gerda Verburg said on Wednesday, announcing ambitious plans for the sector.

Verburg wants a stronger focus on animal health, access to light and improved living and transport conditions, the Agriculture Ministry said in a statement.

T

he bulk of materials for animal feeds should come from Europe to minimise feed products imports and to help ensure sustainability standards, the ministry said.


The Netherlands is the third largest exporter of agricultural products in the world after the United States and France.


Source: http://www.guardian.co.uk/feedarticle?id=7231125



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- CLIMATE CHANGE



· Germany Reiterates Climate Goals, Challenges EU to Act


Jan 17, 2008 - At the end of last year, German Chancellor Angela Merkel lauded the progress made at the International Climate Conference in Bali. Now Germany is concerned that the promises of other nations were just hot air.


Visit: http://www.dw-world.de/dw/article/0,2144,3071483,00.html



· Can Crops be Climate-proofed?


Jan 11, 2008 - Climate change threatens food crops across the world. Now scientists are re-focusing their efforts on crop resilience, rather than yields.


More: http://www.scidev.net/content/features/eng/can-crops-be-climate-proofed.cfm



· EU Rethinks Biofuels Guidelines by Roger Harrabin 


Europe's environment chief has admitted that the EU did not foresee the problems raised by its policy to get 10% of Europe's road fuels from plants.


For the article, visit: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/7186380.stm



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- GREENER LIFE



· New Year's Resolutions: Go Green for a Great 2008!, FoE Press Release


Dec 29, 2007 - Save cash and save the planet by taking up some of Friends of the Earth's suggestions for green New Year's resolutions.


Friends of the Earth is calling on the UK government to make the changes we need in 2008 to start cutting the UK's carbon emissions. Many people will be wondering what they can do as individuals to make a difference, so we have the following suggestions for New Year's resolutions to help everyone go green for a great start to 2008! 


More: http://www.foe.co.uk/resource/press_releases/new_years_resolutions_go_g_21122007.html



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5. SCIENCE AND ETHICS



· National Science Board Science and Engineering Indicators 2008


Jan 15, 2008 - Science and Engineering Indicators, published by the National Science Board, provides a broad base of quantitative information on the U.S. and international science and engineering enterprise.


The following site presents Science and Engineering Indicators 2008, Volume 1 and Volume 2 in PDF format: http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewsr.html?pid=26695



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6. CONFERENCE



· "Progress and Prospects on Water: For a Clean and Healthy World"


World Water Week in Stockholm, 17-23 August 2008, organised by SIWI (Stockholm International Water Institute)


The World Water Week in Stockholm is the leading annual global meeting place for capacity-building, partnership-building and follow-up on the implementation of international processes and programmes in water and development. The 2008 World Water Week in Stockholm will take place August 17-23, 2008. The First Announcement and Call for Papers is now available. The theme of the week is "Progress and Prospects on Water: For a Clean and Healthy World", including a Special Focus on Sanitation. The deadline for workshop paper proposals is February 1, 2008. 


For more information, visit: http://www.worldwaterweek.org


SIWI Official Site: http://www.siwi.org



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7. TAKE ACTION



· Nominate for Nobel Peace Prize -  Reclaim the Nobel Peace Prize


Dear friends of IPB,


One of the highlights of the IPB calendar every year is the possibility of nominating candidates for the Nobel Peace Prize. IPB has the formal right to make a nomination, and we have executed that right most years, and also sometimes managed to attract the interest of the Nobel Committee so that our candidate has also become the Nobel Peace Prize laureate. Board members can also nominate. 


It is now due time to make nominations for 2008. The nomination has to reach the Nobel Institute before the end of January, and I now invite all members and friends of IPB to send suggestions for nominations to our office in Geneva - within the next week or so.  Your suggestions will be collected by our secretary general Colin Archer at email mailbox@ipb.org


Core peace issues

The Nobel Peace Prize has for too many occasions been given to general good purposes, like last year's prize to climate change issues (Al Gore and the intergovernmental panel), and in that way helped to watered down core peace issues like fighting nuclear weapons, working with conflict resolution and non violence.


Many efforts are valuable and may contribute to peace, but it was a specific idea of Alfred Nobel to set up a peace prize in his will, in addition to medicine, physics, literature etc. 


In his will, Alfred Nobel writes that the prize is intended for "fredsförfäktare" - which is a very nice old word in the Swedish language. You may translate that to English as "champions of peace", in any case it has a much stronger value than the usual translation "promoters of peace".


Is it legal?

One could even question whether the current interpretation of the will of Alfred Nobel would stand a legal test. The literature prize is not given to film producers, no matters how good they are, and the Nobel prize for medicine is not given to for instance Al Gore, even if the climate problem is one of the most important health issues we have on earth in the future!


IPB former vice president Fredrik Heffermehl (email: fredpax@online.no) in Norway has stressed the need for questioning the rather pragmatic policies of the Norwegian Nobel Committee and even the legality of their interpretation of the will of Alfred Nobel.


But whatever will happen to such a discussion, the absolute best way to ensure that the Nobel Peace Prize will be given to a Champion of Peace would be to give the committee enough good names to make their choice. 


Attention

No doubt the cause of disarmament and demilitarisation would gain very much from the attention that the Nobel Peace Prize stimulates, both at the annual event in December, and on the day of the announcement. 


That is, in short, why your response with name-suggestions for the IPB nomination is requested this year more than than ever before.


With my best greetings


Tomas Magnusson


President

International Peace Bureau



________________________________________________


8. ANNOUNCEMENTS



· Disarmanent Forum


Disarmament Forum offers clear, forward-looking and accessible analysis on disarmament and security issues to a worldwide readership comprising disarmament and arms control experts, government officials, diplomats, researchers, academics and students.


Each issue of this quarterly, bilingual (English-French) journal focuses on a specific topic related to disarmament and security. Disarmament Forum offers essential, in-depth, up-to-date information and clear analysis written by experts, and targeted to researchers, diplomats, teachers, students and all those who have a strong interest in security, disarmament, arms control and non-proliferation. Each issue of Disarmament Forum is available on-line in its entirety.


In addition to the free print edition, each issue is available online in its entirety. Disarmament Forum is also published in French 

(Forum du désarmement). 


Subscribe to Disarmament Forum: http://www.unidir.org/html/en/disarmament_forum.php



· Job Vacancy


Research Associate, Project on Managing the Atom, Harvard University


Job Description: 

The Managing the Atom (MTA) project at Harvard University is seeking a full-time Research Associate to conduct in-depth research in support of two projects, one focusing on reducing the risks of nuclear theft and terrorism worldwide, and the other addressing key constraints on the future of nuclear energy.  Reporting to the MTA Senior Research Associate, the Research Associate will play a central role in researching and writing a wide range of reports and analyses in these areas.


Job responsibilities will include collecting information, monitoring developments, and generating recommendations for additional action; producing issue briefs, longer reports, and occasional articles for newspapers and magazines on these subjects; maintaining an extensive section of a web site on these topics; and interviewing and interacting with relevant U.S., Russian, and other international officials, as well as other academic and non-government experts.  The position will report to senior associate Matthew Bunn.  This is a grant-funded position, with continuation beyond the first year subject to the availability of funds.


Located in the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, the Managing the Atom project is a multi-year, interdisciplinary research and policy outreach effort to address key strategic issues related to the future of nuclear weapons and nuclear energy.  For more information visit the project website: http://www.managingtheatom.org/


Qualifications: 

- Masters or other advanced degree;

- Strong writing and communications skills;

- Demonstrated skills in preparing and presenting policy-relevant reports and other materials, experience preparing materials for publication preferred;

- Significant knowledge in at least one of the following areas: nuclear security and nuclear terrorism; cooperative threat reduction programs and budgets; global nuclear safety; international safeguards; international approaches to nuclear waste storage and disposal; international nuclear economics and financing.  Knowledge in multiple areas preferred;

- Experience with web and print design software preferred;

- Russian (or other nuclear-relevant) language skills desirable, but not required;

- Self-motivated working style is essential.


Availability: immediate.

Salary: negotiable, commensurate with experience.


Application:

Please submit a cover letter and resume via the Harvard jobs website, requisition number 32550, at: http://jobs.harvard.edu/jobs/summ_req?in_post_id=36517



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9. BOOK RECOMMENDATION



· Jonathan Schell's New Book on the Nuclear Dilemma by David Krieger


Few people have looked as deeply into the nuclear abyss, seen the monster of our own making and grappled with it as has the writer Jonathan Schell.. But Schell is more than a writer. He is also a philosopher of the Nuclear Age and an ardent advocate of caging the beast and rendering it harmless.. Schell's first book on the subject, The Fate of the Earth, awakened many people to the breadth and depth of the nuclear danger and is now a classic.  He has returned to the issue of nuclear dangers (nuclear insanity?) in several of his other books, always providing penetrating insights into the confrontation between humanity and its most deadly invention.


His latest book, The Seventh Decade, The New Shape of Nuclear Danger, may be Schell's most important book yet. In this book, he examines the roots of the Nuclear Age and its current manifestations. He unearths the truth, which once brought to light seems obvious, that the bomb began as a construct in the mind. "Well before any physical bomb had been built," he says, "science had created the bomb in the mind, an intangible thing. Thereafter, the bomb would be as much a mental as a physical object."  


One of the key concepts of the Nuclear Age is deterrence, the belief that the threat of nuclear retaliation can prevent nuclear attack. Schell takes a hard-headed look at deterrence, and finds the concept "half-sane and half-crazy." While it seems sane to seek to forestall a nuclear attack, the half-crazy part (perhaps more than half), "consists of actually waging the war you must threaten, for in that event the result is suicide all around." That suicide writ large becomes what philosopher John Somerville termed "omnicide," the death of all. "In short," Schell deduced, "to threaten seems wise, but to act is deranged."


In the post-Cold War period, deterrence has become even more complex and less certain, tilting toward the "deranged." It is no longer the mental task of threat and counter threat aimed at keeping a fixed and powerful opponent at bay, as it was during the Cold War standoff between the US and USSR. Now, states must consider the possibility of nuclear weapons falling into the hands of terrorist groups, not locatable and not subject to being deterred. In such circumstances, the rationality of deterrence is shattered and even great and powerful states are placed at risk of nuclear devastation by far weaker opponents. In such circumstances, overwhelming nuclear superiority is of no avail.  


The "bomb in the mind" can only do so much. It cannot deter those who cannot be located or are suicidal. Despite their devastating power, nuclear weapons in the hands of powerful states are actually a tepid threat.  Yet, they stand as a major impediment to the post-Cold War imperial project of the United States, a project failing on many fronts, but poised to fail far more spectacularly if nuclear weapons find their way into the hands of terrorist groups.


In today's world, when deterrence has for nearly all sane thinkers lost its magical power in the mind (although in truth it was always a highly risky venture), it has become far harder to justify nuclear arsenals, and the United States has resorted to the vague possibility of a reemergent threat. In considering this, Schell finds, "In the last analysis, the target of the U.S. nuclear arsenal became history and whatever it might produce - not a foe but a tense, the future itself."  


Schell correctly concluded that the George W. Bush administration had far more ambitious and sinister plans for the US nuclear arsenal. Although there was no clearly definable enemy, there was a strongly held vision and normative goal of US global dominance, set forth in the 2001 US Nuclear Posture Review (NPR). Nuclear weapons were required, in Schell's careful study of the NPR "to dissuade, deter, defeat or annihilate - preventively, preemptively, or in retaliation - any nation or other grouping of people on the face of the earth, large or small, that militarily opposed, or dreamed of opposing, the United States."


Schell examines the US imperial project under George W. Bush and its role in shaping US nuclear policy. He points out that the Bush administration ordered its nuclear threats in this way: Iraq, with whom it went to war; Iran, with whom it threatened war; North Korea, which withdrew from the Non-Proliferation Treaty and developed nuclear weapons; and Pakistan, which already had nuclear weapons and a chaotic political environment. Of course, Bush chose exactly the wrong order in terms of the actual security threats posed by these nations. Schell found, "In responding to the universal danger posed by nuclear proliferation, the United States therefore had two suitably universalist traditions that it could draw on, one based on consent and law, the other based on force. Bush chose force. It was the wrong choice. It increased the nuclear danger it was meant to prevent."


In the final section of his book, Schell, who is himself an ardent nuclear abolitionist, reviews earlier attempts to achieve abolition of these weapons.  He goes into heartbreaking detail of the efforts of Presidents Reagan and Gorbachev to achieve the goal of a world free of nuclear weapons.  The two leaders, acting on their own initiative, without the advice or support of their aides (George Shultz is an exception), were incredibly close to agreement to eliminate their nuclear arsenals, but as we know faltered on the issue of missile defenses, which Reagan saw as key and which Gorbachev couldn't accept.  After coming so close to agreement on a plan for abolition, the world settled back to nuclear business as usual.  As Schell pointed out, after the Reagan-Gorbachev Summit at Reykjavík, "Nuclear arsenals may remain not so much because anyone wants them as because a world without them is outside the imagination of the leadership class."


The possibilities of nuclear proliferation and nuclear terrorism led Schell to the conclusion that "with each year that passes, nuclear weapons provide their possessors with less safety while provoking more danger. The walls dividing the nations of the two-tiered [nuclear] world are crumbling." The Reagan-Gorbachev vision has new advocates in former Secretaries of State George Shultz and Henry Kissinger, former Secretary of Defense William Perry, and former chair of the Senate Armed Services Committee Sam Nunn. Their basic premise is that deterrence can no longer be the foundation for 21st century security.  


Schell suggests that should the will for nuclear abolition materialize - something already favored by the majority of Americans - the following principles could guide the effort:


- At the outset, adopt the abolition of nuclear arms as the organizing principle and goal of all activity in the nuclear field; 

- Join all negotiations on nuclear weapons - on nuclear disarmament, on nonproliferation, and on nuclear terrorism - in a single forum;

- Think of abolition less as the endpoint of a long and weary path of disarmament and more as the starting point for addressing a new agenda of global action;

- Design a world free of nuclear weapons that is not just a destination to reach but a place to remain.


Schell concludes that the "bomb in the mind," with us from the outset of the Nuclear Age, will remain with us, but that this is not necessarily a detriment. He points out, "even in a world without nuclear weapons, deterrence would, precisely because the bomb in the mind would still be present, remain in effect. In that respect, the persisting know-how would be as much a source of reassurance as it would be a danger in a world without nuclear weapons."


Jonathan Schell has provided an essential book for our time. He peels back the layers of veils and myths surrounding nuclear dangers and strategies, and offers a sound set of guidelines for moving to a nuclear weapons-free world. This book can help to create the necessary political will to achieve this end. It is required reading for every person on the planet who cares about assuring the future.


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