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The INES Global Responsibility Newsletter reports and comments  –  from a global perspective – on political, technical and societal developments and comprises of regular internal news sections.
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29.11.2011: INES 20th Anniversary

What's New in INES, 1. October 2012

INES has moved to a new address: Marienstr. 19-20, 10117 Berlin. Phone and Fax numbers remain unchanged.

CAMPAIGNS

Commit Universities to Peace
New INES Brochure on Civil Clauses and the Commit Universities to Peace - Campaign

NEWS

Foreign ministers gather in New York to press for ban on nuclear tests
International Symposium on the role of the IAE: Documentation
A Big Project Preliminary Analysis Findings
Right Livelihood Award Laureate Condemns New Russian Law on "Foreign Agents"
Hibakusha, Our Life to Live: A film about the survivors of the atomic bomb attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki
Japan Will Try to Halt Nuclear Power by the End of the 2030s
Opportunity costs: Military spending and the UN's development agenda
IALANA demands comprehensive reform of the IAEA
Cluster Munition Monitor 2012
A Steal at $10 Billion, The United States is building a nuclear bomb that costs more than its weight in solid gold. Why?
The Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty: obstacles to entry into force
Russia's Putin calls for army modernization drive

Making Ammunition Stockpiles Safer with UN Saferguard
ICBL Afghan campaigner wins Emerging Peace Champion award 2012
Russia announces enormous finds of radioactive waste and nuclear reactors in Arctic seas
The World Is Over-Armed and Peace Is Under-Funded
Putting U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policies on Trial in the Court of Public Opinion
New ICAN report: Catastrophic Humanitarian Harm

INES MEMBERS

In Memoriam: Gerd Greune

UPCOMING EVENTS


CAMPAIGNS

Commit Universities to Peace

New INES Brochure on Civil Clauses and the Commit Universities to Peace - Campaign

INES and the International Association Of Lawyers Against Nuclear Arms (IALANA) have compiled background information on the Commit Universities to Peace-Campaign.Please find a reduced version with 7MB and the print version with 29 MB here: Civil_Clause_Final_(2012_09_20).pdf (7M)
www.inesglobal.com/download.php (29 MB)


NEWS

Foreign ministers gather in New York to press for ban on nuclear tests
Foreign ministers and other high-level representatives met today at the United Nations headquarters in New York to issue a joint call for the entry into force of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT).
In their joint statement, the foreign ministers described the CTBT’s entry into force as “a vital step towards the reduction and eventual elimination of nuclear weapons by constraining the development and qualitative improvement of nuclear weapons…We call upon all States that have not done so to sign and ratify the Treaty, in particular the remaining eight Annex 2 States [these are China, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Egypt, India, Iran, Israel, Pakistan and the United States]. Read on here: www.ctbto.org/press-centre/press-releases/2012/foreign-ministers-gather-in-new-york-to-press-for-ban-on-nuclear-tests-issue-joint-call/


International Symposium on the role of the IAEA: Documentation
The documentation of the International Symposium on the role of the IAEA in Vienna from May 3, 2012 is now available online: www.inesglobal.com/download.php


A Big Project Preliminary Analysis Findings
Most populat words in each region
Economic uncertainty. Uprisings around the world. Radical advancements in technology. Global collaboration at a new scale. People everywhere are sensing change. But what are we changing to? Here are the preliminary findings.

Participants from all over the world answered those 4 questions:

  1. If the world as it currently exists were to radically shift tomorrow, and we had the opportunity to recreate the world, what would you NOT want to continue from this world?
  2. What would you want to continue from this world?
  3. What would people need to do differently now to get to that better world?
  4. What is one thing you will commit to doing differently now to get to that better world?

The survey will remain open until 20. December, so if you or your friends haven’t yet answered our four global questions… there's still time!

A Big Project is a part of the International Peace Bureau’s effort to foster disarmament for development around the planet. We are inviting you to take part in an historic effort. We want the voices of disarmament activists to be heard! To find out what the four questions are go to www.abigproject.org/myanswers.


Right Livelihood Award Laureate Condemns New Russian Law on "Foreign Agents"
On September 20th, it became known that the U.S. development agency USAid will have to end its operations in Russia and its support for Russian civil society organisations on October 1. Elena Zhemkova, director of the Russian human rights organisation Memorial, which received the Right Livelihood Award in 2004, strongly condemns the new "law for the regulation of the activity of non-profit organisations, acting as foreign agents". Read more here: www.rightlivelihood.org/press_release_memorial-en.html


Hibakusha, Our Life to Live: A film about the survivors of the atomic bomb attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki
On August 6, 1945, a great terror was thrust upon the world. David Rothausers's 80 minute documentary, Hibakusha, Our Life to Live, probes the life stories of Japanese, Korean and American survivors of the terror; the atomic bomb attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
There is an URGENCY here. The survivors are dying of, victims of radiation poisoning and other a-bomb related diseases. It is equally important to tell the stories on film of people who should never be forgotten. To keep their memory alive is to make an active contribution to a world where peoples of all races may embrace life as a precious gift and no longer live in the fear of nuclear annihilation.

To make this movie, Memory Productions has completed over 90 hours of filming, including interviews with Japanese, Korean and American hibakusha and international youth participating in the 60th Anniversary Peace Ceremonies in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Learn more here: www.hibakusha-ourlifetolive.org/index.html


Japan Will Try to Halt Nuclear Power by the End of the 2030s
Japan seeks to phase out nuclear power by 2039. This energy strategy represents a historic shift away from nuclear power usage which has been prevalent in Japan. However, with the Minister of State for National Policy- Motohisa Furukawa, suggesting that the announcement represented loose guidelines and was open to revision, the critics have blasted this strategy as being vague and long-term. Additionally, lobbyists like Keidenren which represent big businesses in Japan are claiming that if the country moves away from nuclear power, then it will result in higher energy costs and energy shortages. As Japan redrafts its energy policy, it also risks enlarging its carbon footprint. Therefore, the government must use its new energy strategy as a starting point for an ambitious renewable energy policy which would ensure energy efficiency and sustainable green economy. Read the story by Hiroko Tabuchi Japan Sets Policy to Phase Out Nuclear Power Plants by 2040 in the NYT of September 14th, here: www.nytimes.com/2012/09/15/world/asia/japan-will-try-to-halt-nuclear-power-by-the-end-of-the-2030s.html


Opportunity costs: Military spending and the UN's development agenda
A view from the International Peace Bureau
Ever since the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) were adopted by the United Nations in 2000, there has been an intense debate around the world. How to finance them? How to organise development programmes to ensure that the targets are met? How to evaluate progress? And so on.

The deadline in 2015 for achieving the MDGs is fast approaching. Governments have only 3 more years to halve poverty, to reduce by three-quarters the maternal mortality rate, to halt the spread of HIV, etc. Only a few of the 8 MDG targets have been achieved, and only for some states. None of the fragile and conflict-affected countries have achieved any of them. For many of the poorest people in the world, conflict and violence make the development of their region impossible.

As the thinking develops on what will be the follow-up to the MDGs, a new debate is under way. Some governments and NGOs are promoting the idea of a fresh set of targets called the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). There is some rather preliminary language on this in the Rio+20 Outcome Document ‘The Future We Want’. But neither in the original Millennium Development Goals nor in the proposed SDG principles can we find any mention of either Disarmament or Peace. To read the complete statement please click here.


IALANA demands comprehensive reform of the IAEA
Protest at the 56th General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) from September 17.-21. in Vienna, Austria
To read the IALANA press release of September 19, 2012 (in German) please click here.


Cluster Munition Monitor 2012
The Landmine and Cluster Munition Monitor (The Monitor) has released the third Cluster Munition Monitor report, the sister publication to the Landmine Monitor report, which has been issued annually since 1999. Cluster Munition Monitor 2012 provides a global overview of efforts to eliminate cluster munitions with a focus on developments in 2011 and the first half of 2012. It covers global developments in cluster munition ban policy, use, production, trade, and stockpiling, and also includes information on cluster munition survey and clearance of cluster munition remnants, victim assistance and casualties, as well as funding support. Download the report here: www.the-monitor.org/index.php/publications/display


A Steal at $10 Billion, The United States is building a nuclear bomb that costs more than its weight in solid gold. Why?
The United States has two nuclear bomb designs: the B83 and the B61. New plans to modernise the B61 which is the oldest design in the nuclear stockpile have been proposed. The cost to modify the four different designs of the B61, namely, B61 Mods 3, 4, 7 and 10 into a single modification called B61 Mod 12 will cost $10 billion. Earlier plans to modify nuclear weapons which were proposed by the George W. Bush Administration were rejected by the Congress. Additionally, President Obama had stated that no 'new' nuclear weapons will be made. However, since 'new' has no technical meaning, the B61 Mod 12 will determine as to how much nuclear weapons could be redesigned while staying within the political guidance as defined by Obama's 2010 Nuclear Posture Review.

But does the U.S. need to spend so much on nuclear weapons modernisation? Senior military and civilian officials have repeatedly stated that these weapons have no military utility and exist primarily to fulfil political needs. Read the article in Foreign Policy here: www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2012/09/05/a_steal_at_10_billion


The Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty: obstacles to entry into force
The CTBT: obstacles to entry into force examines the policies of the 38 states that have not yet ratified the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). More than 16 years after the treaty was adopted, significant obstacles remain on the path to its entry into force. The Reaching Critical Will project of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) has published this report on government positions on the CTBT to highlight why entry into force of the treaty should not be treated as a precondition to nuclear disarmament or to the commencement of negotiations on a treaty banning nuclear weapons completely.
The report is authored by Eloise Watson, who conducted the research while with the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) in Australia. Eloise is now an intern with Reaching Critical Will. Download the report here: www.reachingcriticalwill.org/resources/publications-and-research/publications/6659-the-ctbt-obstacles-to-entry-into-force


Russia's Putin calls for army modernization drive
Russian President Vladimir Putin has demanded a new armament drive. His goal is to modernise the defence industry of Russia as comprehensively as it was done in the 1930s by Stalin. Frustrated at the military, churning out products such as tanks and weapons system that cost more than their Western rivals while often failing in reliability tests, Putin added that efficiency might be improved if private players were allowed to acquire stakes in military production. Putin would like to make military purchases a focal point of his third term. This plan of modernising the military has put pressure on the other sectors of Putin's budget.Read on here: english.sina.com/world/2012/0902/502550.html


Making Ammunition Stockpiles Safer with UN Saferguard
New Slide Show on UNODA Homepage
There has been a rise in the number of accidental explosive events in ammunitions depot worldwide. 46 such events were reported in 2011, as compared to the 18 events reported in 2001. Therefore, the accumulation of conventional ammunition stockpiles in surplus is of great concern as resulting explosions invariably result in the loss of many lives. In addition, high rates of diversion of ammunition from poorly secured stockpiles in or close to conflict or high crime areas have been taking place. Diverted ammunition are primarily being used by groups involved in intra-state conflict and for making improvised explosive devices (IEDs) which are used in acts of terrorism. The United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs (UNODA), under its UN SaferGuard programme, engaged the assistance of a highly qualified ammunition expert and a Technical Review Panel consisting of experts from United Nations Member States to develop the International Ammunition Technical Guidelines (IATG) in close collaboration with the United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS). Read more about the program here: www.un.org/disarmament/convarms/Ammunition/


ICBL Afghan campaigner wins Emerging Peace Champion award 2012
N-Peace which is a multi-country network to strengthen the role of women in building and restoring peace, declared Ms. Amina Azami from Afghanistan as the winner of the Emerging Peace Champion Award 2012. Ms. Azami is the co-founder of the ICBL Governance Board member-organisation called Afghan Landmine Survivors Organisation (ALSO) and founder of the Women with disabilities Advocacy Committee (WAAC) which is engaged in the promotion and protection of the rights of women and girls with disabilities in Afghanistan.
The award aims to support the emerging leadership of young women who can motivate other young people to get involved. Read on here: www.icbl.org/index.php/icbl/Library/Afghan-campaigner-wins-award


Russia announces enormous finds of radioactive waste and nuclear reactors in Arctic seas
Enormous quantities of decommissioned Russian nuclear reactors and radioactive waste were dumped into the Kara Sea in the Arctic Ocean north of Siberia over a course of decades, according to documents given to Norwegian officials by Russian authorities and published in Norwegian media.Read the article here: www.bellona.org/articles/articles_2012/Russia_reveals_dumps


The World Is Over-Armed and Peace Is Under-Funded
By Ban Ki-moon
Last month, competing interests prevented agreement on a much-needed treaty that would have reduced the appalling human cost of the poorly regulated international arms trade. Meanwhile, nuclear disarmament efforts remain stalled, despite strong and growing global popular sentiment in support of this cause.

The failure of these negotiations and this month’s anniversaries of the atomic bombings at Hiroshima and Nagasaki provide a good opportunity to explore what has gone wrong, why disarmament and arms control have proven so difficult to achieve, and how the world community can get back on track towards these vitally important goals. Read the article in Eurasia Review here: www.eurasiareview.com/27082012-the-world-is-over-armed-and-peace-is-under-funded-oped/


Putting U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policies on Trial in the Court of Public Opinion
By David Krieger
The International Court of Justice, the highest and most authoritative court in the world, has stated that the use of nuclear weapons would be illegal if such use violated international humanitarian law.  Failing to distinguish between civilians and combatants would be illegal, as would any use resulting in unnecessary suffering.  Additionally, the Court found that any threat of such use would also be illegal.  It is virtually impossible to imagine any use or threat of use that would not violate international humanitarian law.

Current US nuclear weapons policy is illegal, immoral and runs a high risk of resulting in nuclear catastrophe.  We cannot wait until there is a nuclear war before we act to rid the world of these weapons of mass annihilation.  The US should be the leader in this effort, rather than an obstacle to its realization.  It is up to the court of public opinion to assure that the US asserts this leadership.  The time to act is now.
Read the article here: www.wagingpeace.org/articles/db_article.php


New ICAN report: Catastrophic Humanitarian Harm

The International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), has just published a new booklet about the catastrophic effects of nuclear weapons on our health, societies and the environment. The publication examines the harm caused by nuclear attacks on cities, nuclear testing and nuclear weapons production.
To download the booklet, click here.


INES MEMBERS

In Memoriam: Gerd Greune
We are very sad to announce the sudden death of Gerd Greune (15 March 1949 - 24 August 2012), former Executive Board member and Secretary General (1979-1981) of the IPB  and long term INES member.
Gerd graduated as a teacher but discovered politics very early. The right to conscientious objection was his first political issue, developing into a general involvement in the German and international peace movement and campaigning against the stationing of nuclear weapons in Europe and nuclear arms in general. For many years he played a leading role in the German peace movement. To read the obituary by IPB please click here.


UPCOMING EVENTS